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at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get the next a feeling like you've been beaten by a guerrilla with a baseball bat. and you feel you've been beaten by a gorilla with a baseball bat to wander into the street and get hit by a truck. don't get a checkup when y
. it defies the first law. the law of the conservation of energy. every respectable scientists will understand, why live, in exasperation and trying to get simple objects across to you, infinitely smaller than a pinprick infinitely shows its head. suddenly, a call of singularity. this just does not make sense. act as if nothing has happened. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy. and it has three properties that never existed before. three properties that are common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space, and speed. how in the nonexistent world to the nothingness pull this off? the pinprick keeps coming out. a space-time manifold occurs and i am stunned. what is happening? what is powering all the speed. oneworld invented these peculiar things? if they weren't invented, how the heck did the others break them out? well, i'm sitting here with my jaw-dropping. you are as cool as a scoop of gelato in a block of ice. you make another of your wacky predictions. the giant sale of space and time is about to produce something. called things. those
will be a big part of it. >> i will correct you. i said this to my fans. i get my energy from being them mayor of the city but people get the job done every single day. also with the work that we do i am proud to give a modicum of support to what you we're doing but there are heroes of light and energy working with covenant house there is a young kid that will be born to one of the children there you will never know their name and they will feel the love. science shows if you look at the stars tonight just imagine think that is hundreds of billions of light years away and many are gone and do not exist but the energy and lightbulb body gives of goes on forever generations yet unborn feel that light we may have a finite time of eris but every single day we should burn s bright and as more and brilliant as possible. those elected the state's elected officials and has been fueled with a conspiracy of love. i and my father had a lot of colorful things he would say about me as a kid he would say jokingly don't walk around in here like you hit a triple. i was a po. [laughter] you were born on third
's an interesting energy that it is hard to put your finger on, cooper who live quote in the book is not native, she moved here in the 80s and longtime journalist and really smart thing for about detroit and she talks about how detroit is a place where people are doing things everyday that you are not expected to do and people coming home from work not patrolling their neighborhoods because there are not police, reclaiming vacant lots, turning into gardens or a bird concert tour boarding up vacant houses, there's a chapter in the book about detroit, that surprised me, the extent of that and how real and inspirational that can be. >> some of the characters you come across in your journey in this book are familiar characters, characters we see written up all the time in reference to detroit. one of them is tyree guyton who lives not too low far from me and where i grew up and i don't know how many different things i have read about him, i have met him several times. this treatment of him was very different than anything else i had seen and i wanted to read a couple graph of how you captured him and ta
of school dhaka would cost energy. not money to the teachers. i don't need incentives for your kids performing better i mean for trying harder. >> this raises an interesting question. there are some school districts that are using cash incentives for teachers based on whether the kids showing in pronounced and riss tests. they are not being taught how to think. they are being taught how to take a test. >> what do you mean about disrespectful to the teacher? spec to say to get your kids to perform better we will give you a little extra. >> no, no. my god. [laughter] >> no, i actually think that in the days when we had expectations of learning we were taught to think and the test existed to see how well we thought. >> right here. >> i think the end justifies the small amount of money. >> in the end what is the end exactly? it is to get them to read more books. to educate and get the american level of education not to other countries to educate them. >> fair is someone sitting next to you that disagrees triet [laughter] >> you destroy their love of learning into the value of reading a
"' series on the cloud factories, the enormous amounts of energy consumed by some of these massive data centers. what impressed me in my visit to the internet was the efforts towards efficiency, particularly at the top of the business, particularly the googles and the facebooks and the yahoo!s all striving towards making their data centers as efficient as possible and all recognizing quite clearly that it's often more efficient to keep your stuff on, you know, in this massive machine than it is to have it on a machine, you know, sitting humming on your desk. so, you know, i -- there's a, um, a professor at stanford whose name has just escaped me but who points out, you know, information technology only uses about 2% of energy. but when you poll people about how much energy they think it uses, they'll readily say 50% because our lives are so intertwined with these machines. but every time you kind of look under rocks, it turns out it's quite an efficient way of doing business. >> host: and, andrew blum, if you had -- if you could or if you have aggregated the amount of investment put in
, you know, i said this to my staff today. i get a lot of psychic energy from being the mayor of the city, but yet i'm there, there's managers, people who get the job done every single day whose names you never hear about. and i'm very proud to have been able to give a modicum of support to the incredible work that you're doing. but you know that there are heroes of light and energy that are working with covenant house in newark that are making transformative changes. there is a young kid one day that's going to be born to one of the children there that you'll never even know their name, generations unborn will feel that love. so that's my challenge to everybody, and science shows this. if you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star -- [laughter] but just imagine when you look up and see a star, think to yours that a that's -- yourself that that's hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of those stars no longer exist n. the billions of years it's taken for that light to get to you, the star itself is gone. bu
get a lot of psychic energy of being the mayor of the city and i'm there, but there's managers who get the job done every day you don't hear about. the same work that we do, i'm very proud to give support to the incredible work you're doing, but you know there's heros of light and energy that are working within covenant house in newark making transformative changes. there is a young kid one day to be born to one of the children there and you'll never know their name, generations unborn feel that love. that's the challenge to everybody, and this is -- science shows us, you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star, but imagine when you look up and see a star, think hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of the stars you are looking at are gone. they no longer exist, and the billion of years the light takes to get to you, the star is actually gone, but the energy and life is immuneble and goes on forever. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time o
in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucratic for me. so i wanted to break out and do something more on gennaro. i get involved in the financial revolution, started being a managing editor of a news article, the inflation survival letters in the 1970's which is now called personal finance, a much more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the tri
are gorgeous. and talking about the energy. there's a beautiful energy. there's the light. the humor. the lighting is not perfect, but the woman in the red, but with the way flowers is turned to her left in the look of what can only be described as gleeful amusement. obviously something very funny headset in this photo was snapped in this group of women. delay, humor, playfulness and the interactions of the screw. this is unusual. but we are accustomed to seeing his images in dreariness, bleakness, depictions that on the surface communicate injustice. if you are familiar, toyota to miyake's photograph of three boys advance in our stand to end looking wistfully across a barbed wire fence come a black-and-white image. that's the classic image of japanese-american incarceration. this is something quite different. notice the contrast between the beauty of the subject in the bleakness of the backdrop. the dry, parched ground they stand on. tarpaper barracks they lived in. the chimney of the communal masala. it is again something i suggested in the early photograph the openness of japanese
that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour to totalitarian but it's a very traditional autocrat. >> one of the interesting hinges of this book is your discussion about the fall of the berlin wall, and if i read it right, you say that it may appear optimists. it made us to convinced that himeno agencies our system of democracy, system of free markets would have the transforming power. >> talk about that and take that story through the 1980's and into the 90's. >> the fall of the berlin wall eliminated constraints. we thought because we can get to the red army out of eastern europe it suddenly with a transforming effect in the middle east and sub-saharan afric
of the manufacturing costs and some of the alternative energy manufacturing costs are coming down. the equation is a little more balanced, and that said, you know, in the case of apple, they do the manufactures here, but in the case where they have to integrate design and production to make the new iphone, they do that stuff here, but then theyoff shore mass production which is the biggest challenge for the united states. how to get the mass production back. where -- most of the companies i focus on are either small or medium sizedded businesses. they are making niche products or interesting customized products where you can't mass produce it. you can't just offshore that to china, or they are constantly staying at the front of the innovation curve. one of the companies named one, two, three, that i deal with says they basically have an agreement with china saying that they will give them all the old technology to satisfy the joint venture agreement as long as they don't have to give them their newest latest technology. they are basically giving them intellectual property that's anything but th
plenty of energy. and she said she would just be delighted to keep me in el paso for school, and so that was the arrangement that was made. and i went away to school. i would come home at christmas and over easter break and in the summers, but other than that, i was staying in el paso. and that was all right, except i was homesick. i really loved the ranch and loved being with my parents, and i didn't want to be away. so i remember those years with considerable pain, actually. c-span: what was it like when you found out that your mother had been married before? >> guest: well, i was very shocked. c-span: what year was that? >> guest: oh, i don't remember. i was a student in el paso, and i remember one of the children i knew saying, 'i know something about you. 'no, you don't. 'yes, i do.' i know something about you and your mother.' 'no, you don't. what is it?' 'well, your mother was married before. she had another husband.' and i said, 'oh, that's not true. i know you're wrong.' and when i went home to my grandmother's that evening, i asked her about it. i said, 'now somebody at sc
up every last hour, every moment of energy and of light. so what do we make of this man who was so eager to embrace the day, to enjoy it, end to endure -- to endure as long as he did? i think we have to see him for what he was. he was a working politician. here is what george washington wrote to jefferson and to hamilton in their relatively rough early days in the cabinet in the 1790s when, as jefferson put it, we were daily pitted in the cabinet like two concludeses at each other -- cocks at each other's throats. how unfortunate that internal dissensions should be harrowing and tearing our vitals. harrowing and tearing our vitals. it's very unwashington. it's a very vivid phrase. john adams in the same r rah, the same years said that jefferson's mind is poisoned with passion, prejudice and faction. hamilton said of jefferson -- this is how well the washington people worked -- hamilton said of jefferson that anyone who cares about the liberty of the country or welfare of the nation should look with great despair upon jefferson's ascendance to the presidency. and jefferson, in a, wi
and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity. working, and founding fathers wanted, he is majority leader for six years. at an end six years he leaves. instantly the senate is back in the same mess. the nature of political genius is to find a way, when no way appears obvious. i don't have any idea what president johnson would do, hopefully i could research it. someone will come along to do it again. >> one of the major events in this book is the u.s. role and overthrow -- johnson is on record in the cabinet meetings opposing it. can you elaborate on what particularly drove his stance and what particularly was that on that and why he believed the way he did on that point? one of the things he agreed with robert kennedy on. >> can i take a pass on that one question? the reason is is at the beginning of the book i am writing now. it is -- the answer is so complicated, i don't have a summation of it in my mind right now. >> can i go back and refer to your book that you are talking about now than? you alluded when you stated united states was running under the kennedy admini
will be okay. >> directing your energies like continuing the trustee in the preservation of all that means billion don't care whether it's physical or digital. >> and $0.1 the agency that i had, because i hate to speak exclusively, a love affair with the printed word. not on how something was presented, we were very public oriented. so you do everything you possibly can to move into the public domain. that implies you use every conceivable restaurant. we are in the knowledge development and the knowledge dissemination. we do a film. we preserve will books. we help finance the writing of new books. then we try to bring the public in texas to analysis. therefore we are very big into digitization. one of my favorite quotes, the archivist to lexus said particularly in the area of research, many young people, scholars from if it is in on the internet it doesn't exist. that's a fairly awesome thought. and so that means that it speaks to nextel's as well as tech ~. i think real identify with that, but we also identify with what i hope is that dual circumstance, have a book with paper and also hav
, tom putnam, who brings such energy to library's mission of preserving our nation's history. and our good friend we always love having with us, john. the president used a dictaphone to record his personal observations following key meetings and events. we thought they would all enjoy in the actual dictaphone that he used as senator before becoming president. we put it on the stage and we invite you can look at it after the form. this is the real thing, this is what he used in the senate. the one he used as president is now in the archives. over the years come we have welcomed many individuals to the state who have worked for president kennedy. those who vote for him and served in navy and knew him as a friend. they all have their own take and interpretation of what happened, their own spin. now it is the term of president kennedy. a principal speaker tonight, of which we invite you to listen to. it is that of president kennedy. many see this is the one president kennedy never had the opportunity to write. it is now my great pleasure to introduce the individual who is most responsible
:45 and then off to mass every day. he spent an incredible amount of julieanna energy, and i think the fact that he saw every day the gift from god as corny as that sounds interacting with you was as big a deal to him as it was interacting with president kennedy because i think that he saw having been in the war and experienced the depression and really believe in that every person and every interaction was a gift, and i think people get burned out a lot in public service. often times because it is really about them. and i think he didn't get burned out even though he is 95. he was always asking about other people, how you were doing because he was so confident he had a relationship with god, but that god had given him that interaction and that human being. did you both serve in the peace corps? did you meet in the peace corps? did you get married before you went into the peace corps? were you serving in the same country? you were? okay good. it's romantic, right? [laughter] and you are still married, right? [laughter] maybe not. i don't know. [laughter] [applause] that's fantastic. that's unbeliev
energy source is used we more. so, it's kind of, you know, there is a peacekeeping one of these evils. it's just that it personally you try to get rid of the problem and i think it is a bigger problem, and then it goes back to making sure they're somehow done in a better way and pick and choose where you put them. one thing we haven't talked about a very frustrating thing that i learned in this book is that there is no stopping mining the state's road along 1972 the general mining law act that basically was like the homestead act that said get people out west and what they said is you pay $5 an acre on the the federal land and you can mind. right now the companies making billions of dollars are paying $5 an acre to the united states. they are making billions. worse than that there is no royalty. if you mine for oil and gas in this country pay eight to 10% copper, nothing. worse than that the way that it's written we have no ability to say no. nothing so we can't stop it even if we want to i must change it and we can't because congress has enough people from the west and various power sour
. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project and our annual veterans day captain matthew freeman 5k run for piece. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town to captain matthew freeman project proudly announced a new scholarship that we will be starting for the siblings of the fallen in combat. these are the forgotten mourners who often sacrifice and postpone their education to comfort family or deal with their own grief. after 11 years at war very few people know about goldstar families. these are parents, siblings, thousands of children who survived the death of their loved one. as a mother of a fallen marine, i'm su
a penchant for acts of wild folly. he had an uncle on his mother side he was possessed of energy so maniacal that he -- stoned blackhawks good sense and deceptiveness, simkins wrote. what his father achieved by indirection, stone pursued openly and come in the process, attracted enemies. characteristics of halt and stone stoopes in simkins memoir provide context for defining event in the lives of will and strom thurmond. in the mid 1920s when strom was living at home in edgefield and teaching of the local high school, a situation developed inside the household going to when strom's acts of wild both. among the service employed was a 16 year-old african-american girl. october 1925, butler gave birth to a daughter, whom she named and see me. six months later, butler's sister took her to pennsylvania where she was moving with her husband. she passed the child to another sister who raised her as her own. not until she was 13 did she learn the identity of her actual mother. three years later, she met her father, strom thurmond, in his law office just off the town square in edgefield. essie mae's
into energy, into immigration, entrepreneurship and a lot of other areas where we think policies f they change -- if they change, can promote growth. so i thank you all for coming. thank you, mr. president, and, please, pick up your book on the way out. [applause] and read it. ?rsh. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> next, chrystia freeland talks about the rides of the super rich, the top .1% of the global population. and the impact they have in the world. this talk was hosted by politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of beg
of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we called an american legacy book tour. we're fond of the libraries, as you know, and we made a movie calle
urban mechanics. some of you may be in the audience to today. but that energy, that talented, that brains around energizing and engineering a community's capability to lift people, that's what we've got going on in this city. that's why this room is full. >> absolutely. >> i ask the development question because i, i feel compelled to ask a news-oriented question, i don't know why. [laughter] >> paul, -- bob, can i say one thing? >> i'll get you to weigh in in a second. the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a billion dollar casino complex being built in east boston at the suffolk downs race track if the developers win the eastern massachusetts casino license, one of the three licenses up for grabs from east to west in the state. the new state gaming commission, of course, has to go through its process, but most insiders you talk to think that the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way. and i'm wondering and, ed, let me start with you here, and then i want to go to ayanna because she has to consider this on the city counc
all of the energy that ought to go into planning cyber war to a bunch of legal abstract debates. and the generals are sitting in the sideline saying, well, tell me what i can do. this is exactly the wrong way to treat government lawyers or maybe lawyers generally. much more effective if you say, we sat down and tell what it would take to win a cy reward. after we worked it through, the only way we can win is if we do this. is that legal? then you're going to get useful legal advice. probably they will find a way to say it is because most lawyers do not want to cause us to lose the next war. if you wait until they tell you what you can do, you will never know what you can do and you will never know how to win the cyber war. this i fear is where we are today. >> what you take of this view? >> i'm not actually sure i follow that restricting. i would like to think you for putting this together and particularly this book. so many of the issues that we have in lot today are very complex, and we have to have a way to access the broader our audience. just by the fact that this is that t
usefully dedicate our energies and our intelligence is. in order to sustain and nurture the ever evolving culture is of the book. thank you very at. [applause] >> this program is part of the 2012 international summit of the book. for more information, visit loc.gov/international-book -- don't summit. >> who is rob cox? >> he is my deceased uncle who made the decision six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against them and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him porphyrins, another man who was a student at harvard who had recently graduated and they were doing what they could to help the cause. saving their liberties against the forces of market fascism. >> he was studying at harvard at the time. what was his life trajectory at that point? >> he liked his four brothers and they had grown up in new jersey together and vermont where his family had had property for quite a long time. several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school, where he was
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)